Spring and Summer Workshops and Revision Courses

Spring and Summer Workshops and Revision Courses

Rochester Workshops, Mock Assessments and Revision Courses

Call or email to book you place: 01634 814420 / rochester@right-tuition.co.uk

1. Year 5 / 3 hr Revision Courses
Tue 30 May – Maths revision (Revising Decimals, Fractions, Averages, Area, Perimeter, Volume, Percentages)
Wed 31 May – Problem Solving Workshop (Learning different methods and approaches to Maths problems)
Thu 1 June – Creative Writing (Revising Story, Script, News report, Diary, Letter, Leaflet formats)
Fri 2 June – Imagination Workshop (learning how to generate initial ideas and to plan relevant plot lines for creative writing)
Sat 3 June – Kent Comprehension and SPaG (revising technique)

2. 11+ Mock Assessments 
Medway and Kent paper sets available and include comprehensive report and post-assessment consultation.
Revision and assessment are open to registered and external pupils.
Mon 24 July
Tue 25 July
Wed 26 July
Morning and afternoon sessions available. 

Tunbridge Wells Workshops, Mock Assessments and Revision Courses

Call or email to book you place: 01892 800492 / tunbridgewells@right-tuition.co.uk

1. August 11+ Revision Courses
Tue 1 Aug – Fri 1 September
Hours
10-12pm Maths
12-1pm Verbal Reasoning
1-2pm Lunch
2-3pm Non Verbal Reasoning
3-4 English

2. 11+ Mock Assessments

Sun 4 June 10am-1pm

Sun 16 July 10am-1pm


Sevenoaks Workshops, Mock Assessments and Revision Courses

Call or email to book you place: 01732 441023 / sevenoaks@right-tuition.co.uk

1. 11+ Mock Assessment

Mon 29 May 10am-1pm

August 11+ Revision Classes

 

Our 11+ revision classes take place throughout the month of August. 

Our courses are designed in such a way so as to offer flexibility upon which day you can attend. Year after year, our August 11+ revision classes have been the vital catalyst towards ensuring that children achieve a positive result in September’s quiz. The classes give children comprehensive oversight of ALL aspects of the 11+ exam. In addition, these classes offer a healthy balance between the revision of essential and challenging 11+ topics, as well as a series of timed exercises. Our exclusive learning materials are developed in a way that reflect the precise nature and wording of the 11+ questions that they expect to face. The period between the end of the summer term and the beginning of the following academic year (the week when the date for the 11+ is, more often than not, set!) is a too long a time to neglect 11+ preparation. Our August revision classes are structured in a way that enables knowledge, skills and confidence to stay refreshed, topped up and further developed, whilst also allowing for those fundamental periods of rest and relaxation.

 

11+ Guidance

Overall Approach:

Supplementary learning, in the form of preparation for the 11+, should be carried out in a calm, systematic manner. A child must be taught in an inspiring way that aims to achieve a dual objective; consolidating knowledge and skills that are in tune with the national curriculum, whilst generating a love of learning that allows children to embrace those extra demands of the 11+ syllabus. In preparing for this quiz, the intention should always be to provide children with the core fundamentals of learning; the ability to problem solve and think logically, thus making a child a productive learner for the 11+ and beyond.

When should preparation begin?

If we take the avoidance of unnecessary hysteria to be the ultimate goal within 11+ preparation, like when preparing for anything in life, we want to avoid a mad rush. One extra hour a week (no more!), throughout Year 4, is incredibly helpful in introducing a child to the joys that can be gained through a stimulating form of supplementary education. With the demands presented by a vast national curriculum, Year 4 is vital in establishing those all-important solid foundations that will enable a child to hit the floor running when they enter Year 5. An extra hour a week can achieve four main things. It can cite gaps in knowledge that might have been missed as a result of the rapid coverage of topics at school, accelerate learning at a child’s own pace, help to maximise a child’s academic potential and discover a passion for learning.

The Year 5 journey:

These twelve months should be about receiving calm and professional advice, the opportunity to benefit from invigorating teaching, regular assessment and the development of new skills and confidence. The quiz needn’t be mentioned until June! The intention should be to build upon the progress achieved at school and relish the opportunity to learn new topics, such as reasoning, more advanced grammar rules, as well as Maths topics related to ratio, probability and algebra. With the popularity of after-school clubs and the fact that there are 168 hours in a week, two one-hour lessons a week, plus 45 minutes’ homework, is a relaxed and manageable amount of supplementary learning to undertake. The 11+ is not about succeed or fail. It is a mere barometer, serving to highlight whether a Grammar School is likely to be a suitable environment within which a child can learn and flourish at Secondary level.

Taking the sting out of the 11+

The angst that surrounds the 11+ can be tied to three principal vehicles. In triggering an open discussion around these three areas, one hopes that we can begin to reduce the irrepressible frenzy that girdles this pressing Tunbridge Wells topic.

  • Firstly, the vast majority of schools are inclined to disregard the issue and not talk about it; nor do they appear to offer any assistance to pupils or parents. This creates a secretive aura around the issue, which presents a significant challenge to parents regarding their knowledge of how preparation should be approached most effectively. As a consequence, a fervent atmosphere of competition can make it even trickier for parents to know what the best course of action should be. My advice would be to seek an informed opinion from a specialist within this domain and put on the ear-muffs at the school gates!
  • Secondly, our great nation’s media would do well to dig beneath the veneer of this issue and develop a more profound debate about ‘tutoring’, our approach to assessments as a nation and grammar schools at large. I would suggest that the 11+ narrative, as projected by the media, has become stuck in a vacuum. Within recent years, an ever-wider demographic have begun to gain access to supplementary learning, as rates have been driven down by the emerging prominence of small group learning. Nowadays, more children than ever are benefiting from a more diversified educational experience and, consequently, are having the ceiling of aspiration removed, thus enabling them to realise their true potential.
  • Lastly, it goes without saying that parents always have the absolute best intentions for their child; however, all too often, this can boil over, producing high degrees of anxiety that can filter down to the very people for whom they desire the best for. This tension can be alleviated by talking to professionals who specialise in the area of the 11+ and by making sure that discussions around this topic are always open, honest and frank.

Supplementary learning, in the form of preparation for the 11+, should be carried out in a calm, systematic manner. A child must be taught in an inspiring way that aims to achieve a dual objective; consolidating knowledge and skills that are in tune with the national curriculum, whilst generating a love of learning that allows children to embrace those extra demands of the 11+ syllabus. In preparing for this quiz, the intention should always be to instil children with the core fundamentals of learning; the ability to problem solve and think logically, thus making a child a productive learner for the 11+ and beyond.